WOL on #OZLearn: from chatting to action

On Tuesday night, we had a great OzLearn twitter chat on working out loud (WOL) inspired by Simon Terry, who also added tons of value with his contributions in the chat. Whilst there was a bit of confusion at the outset of the chat about what WOL is, by the end many were talking about experimenting with WOL and putting it into practice:

This is so exciting to see – a commitment to action and behaviour change is a sure sign that something has clicked, that people have been inspired, that critical learning has occurred. And then – the next day, I woke up the next day to this conversation:

And all of a sudden, in a flutter of tweets we went from John Stepper putting the idea of WOL circles out there, to us planning Google Hangouts, John sending us drafts of his book, and Michelle posting  about WOL with an open invitation to join the WOL Circle that we’ll be starting.

So what’s a WOL Circle?

It’s basically a small peer support group – specifically formed & structured for those in it to support each other to make their work more visible – and to kick start a habit of ‘working out loud’. It’s a 12 week, “guided mastery program” – a format which John adapted from Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In Circles.

What excites me about this WOL Circle

I am definitely interested in improving my own WOL practices – and in particular – making it a habit to do so (making a writing habit is something I’ve struggled with). But what additionally intrigues and excites me about trying out the concept is the prospect of collaborating closely on this with a trusted peer group, and getting first-hand experience of a potentially powerful format for peer learning and sustained behaviour change and personal /professional development – which could of course, be adapted for achieving similar goals within an organisation – and potentially transforming it.

The other personally inspiring aspect of this particular circle is that it has spawned from the OzLearn chat. Full credit to Con (@LearnKotch) who started up the OzLearn chat, and who reaches out to leaders in the field each month to feature a guest post. Being part of the crew who helps make it happen is satisfying and a great learning experience (we take turns moderating, storifying, and all promote the chat to our networks).

So if you’d like to get involved in the WOL Circle, go visit Michelle’s blog and let us know. #OzLearn is on every 2nd Tuesday of the month..and it looks like Con already has plans in the wings for next month’s guest contributor. Come check it out.

 

 

 

Writing-meeting up-collaborating

I’m conscious that I haven’t published on this blog for a while – and that’s partly because I have been writing elsewhere. I’ve also been to some new meetups and collaborating (co-writing, reviewing, commenting, conversing) in various communities and associated offshoots I’m involved with.

I have some half finished (or half-started?) posts in the making. But ahead of our upcoming #OzLearn chat on working out loud (inspired by Simon Terry), I thought I’d short circuit them all and do a little retrospective work out loud post on some of the things I’ve been doing. Kind of like my friend Helen Blunden’s “What have I been up to?” posts (which I always enjoy!).

Writing

Much of my writing recently has been associated with EdConteXts.org – a great project which I’m facilitating with a bunch of standout educators across the globe. It’s been enlightening – mostly because it’s led me to read widely, in areas I wouldn’t necessarily have otherwise, and to collaborate closely with educators who introduce me to new perspectives, ideas, contexts in learning and education, and connections in different domains. Plus opportunities to write in new contexts, including:

Meetups

July ended up being packed with new meetup experiences – I attended 3 new ones (none of which I hosted!):

  1. ResponsiveOrg meet on co-working & new ways to work, organised by Mark Woodrow. It was my intention to attend one of these since I saw Simon Terry tweet that he was speaking at a responsivecoffee event in Sydney. Although I wasn’t able to make that one, it piqued my curiosity of the ‘responsivecoffee’ / ‘ResponsiveOrg’ concept. I signed up to notifications of their meetup events. The stars aligned: the July event was on coworking -something I’d been looking into for the Sydney Third Place group (e.g. similar to these coworking events Helen has been doing in Melbourne). It presented a great opportunity to check out a prominent coworking space in Sydney (The Hub), a responsivecoffee / org event – and to explore potential common interests between ResponsiveOrg and Third Place. So, the Sydney Third Place event for July became an invite to join me at the ResponsiveOrg event. It was a really good experience. I’ve started writing more about it (another post).
  2. Third Place all cities Google + Hangout – Helen had the genius idea of organising a G+ Hangout as an opportunity for Third Place people across cities to meet (virtually) –and also to experiment with Hangout features and functionality. I’d always wanted to do some sort of cross-city event, and hadn’t done a Hangout before so thought it was a great opportunity. Helen has written more about the event here. My impression? Whilst I can see Hangouts being an excellent tool to meet and collaborate virtually on specific projects, they (and any virtual meeting spaces) may still have some way to go to achieve the type of immediacy and intimacy (& serendipitous distraction) of an informal face to face meetup. I think part of the reason is because it’s difficult to hear more than one person talking, you invariably end up having one person speak at any one time. This gives it the ambience of a more formal meeting, particularly for 10 or close to 10 people. Whereas in an informal face to face meeting of this size, people would naturally fall into smaller side conversations – whilst still being in the same physical space as the rest of the group (and having access to surrounding conversations) – these natural divisions are impossible to achieve in a virtual meeting space (breakout areas=separate subgroups). Ryan and I are doing another in a few weeks, so it’ll be interesting to see if my impressions change after that. Maybe once you relax and get used to the medium, the (perhaps, mental?) divide between virtual and physical starts to close.
  3. eLearning collective meetup – I’d been meaning to check out this newish meetup group started by Kerrie Burow, especially since our conversation on video based learning via Ryan’s blog. It’s always nice to meet people you interact with online. As an organiser of Third Place meetup events in Sydney, I’m also interested in checking out alternative meetup groups – for inspiration and potentially collaboration. I finally had the chance to attend an eLearning collective meet a couple of weeks ago. It was a good event – more semi-formal (with organised speaker/s and ‘round table’ discussion) than the completely informal get-together-&- have-a-chat format of Third Place. Excellent turnout (possibly about 30-40) and a whole different set of learning people in the room – perhaps with a higher proportion of education/higher ed and vocational ed & training (VET) than corporate (as tends to be the case with our Sydney Third Place people). Having perused the topics and attendees of their previous meets this didn’t altogether surprise me. But it’s also something that intrigues and interests me: the formation of links and connections across these different contexts, which are often perceived as being distinct from each other – but at the core deal with many of the same issues: learner engagement, relevant & meaningful learning experiences, facilitating collaborative and student centred pedagogies (via technology). There is more that I can and will write of this meetup. But I’ll save that for a separate post.